Book Reviews

Book Review – The Hate U Give by Angie Thomas

Disclaimer: If you believe Trayvon Martin, Mike Brown, Eric Garner, Philando Castile, Freddie Gray, Tamir Rice, Ezell Ford, Rekia Boyd, Sandra Bland, etc. deserved to be killed, kindly leave my blog and never come back. Kay, thanks…



Also, I have nothing against cops; in fact, my aunt’s a cop, and I respect the jobs they have to do and know that the good cops outweigh the bad ones. I do have something against cops who shoot first and ask questions later, are racist, or just are all-around shitty people.

The Hate U Give is an extremely powerful novel stemming from the Black Lives Matter Movement and multitude of cases where unarmed African American men, women, and children have been gunned down by (mostly) white police officers. It is a novel that needs to be read in today’s current political climate, especially by teenagers. The novel follows Starr Carter, a girl who feels she is straddling two worlds: her life in a not-so-great neighborhood where gangs run the streets and her predominantly white prep school. After leaving a party, Starr becomes the sole witness of the murder of her best friend, Khalil, at the hand of a white police officer.  Starr is the only one who is able to give the full story about what happened that night and there are some who don’t want that story told. 

What I Liked: 

ALL OF THE THINGS!

First, I love Angie Thomas’s prose and writing style: simple yet powerful. I also really love that Ms. Thomas used a lot of slang and even cuss words within the novel. It made the novel so much more authentic. I mean, people can be up in arms about there being cursing in YA novels all they want, but there’s no use pretending that teens don’t cuss. And this is coming from someone who said “What the fluffer-nutter!” until my junior year of college. 

The characters are just amazing, especially Starr, her parents, brothers, and other relatives. They were not perfect by any means, but their love and devotion for each other was solid. Starr’s father’s character arc is one we don’t normally see: an ex-gang member trying to redeem himself in the eyes of his wife, children, and community. The bond Starr has with him brought tears to my eyes on numerous occasions. 

Starr’s relationship with her boyfriend, Chris, was really cute. If there’s a sequel or companion novel, they still better be together.

I definitely side-eyed Starr’s friend, Hailey. She’s that type of friend that leaves you constantly cringing about whether what came out of her mouth might have been racist but to avoid drama you don’t say anything. I have definitely learned that when it comes to these types of so-called friends, you have put a lid on comments that offend you from the get-go or they’ll constantly think you’re okay with it. 

However, the cop that killed Khalil and the cops that tried to justify Khalil’s death especially bothered me.  Just because someone sells drugs does not mean they deserve to die! Especially not in cold blood. You see this again and again with these cases. Look at the Mike Brown case. They made him seem like a thug to make his death seem justified and it’s not fair. With Philando Castile, they said he was a monster because he smoked weed in front of his child but there was recently an article about “supermoms” who smoke weed. And don’t tell me it has nothing to do with race because it does but that’s a post for another day. 

The only thing I particularly didn’t like about the novel was King, the neighborhood drug lord. Ugh I wanted to slap him with a brick on every page he was on. 

I appreciated how realistic the verdict was, and understood why the author wrote the ending the way she did. 

There is honestly so much more I can say about this novel, but I have to say you have to read it for yourself. I am floored that it took me this long to read this. I firmly recommend The Hate U Give to everyone, especially African American teenagers. After all , the scene where Starr describes being talked to about what to do if stopped by a cop is a common staple in many homes, including mine. The problem is that it shouldn’t be. Ms. Thomas’s book is  a stunning one about police brutality and its consequences. 

Book Reviews

Book Review – Becoming Marie Antoinette by Juliet Grey, or Why I Couldn’t Be a French Princess

Becoming Marie Antoinette is an intriguing novel that follows the early life of doomed queen Marie Antoinette from her early years as a child in Austria under her formidable mother, the Empress Maria Theresa, to her ascension as queen of France. I’m actually surprised at how much I enjoyed this book, even though I did put it down at one point.

What I Liked:

Juliet Grey managed to humanize Marie Antoinette. In so many other novels I’ve read, Marie is either portrayed as a saint or as the devil incarnate. There’s not usually a happy medium. However, in this book, while Marie is shown with both good and flawed character traits, like any character should. This portrayal really makes her feel relatable. I mean, it couldn’t have been easy leaving the only home you’ve ever known to marry a boy you’ve never met at the age of fourteen. When I was fourteen, I was still under the impression that I had to put my arms and legs inside my blankets so nothing would “get” me. In other words, if I was her, I’d be pretty inept. Now, I’m not exactly saying that she was inept when she got to France, but she could’ve benefited from one more year at home with her mother. She never understood how precarious her position as the dauphine and thus the queen of France was. Hell, she couldn’t even take part in politics because it wasn’t something the queen consort of France should worry her pretty little head about. Ugh. No wonder all she cared about was having fun and gambling. That’s probably all I would have cared about, too.

The author also managed to bring Versailles to life, especially the ridiculous rules regarding the etiquette of the royal court. I would have HATED living in the French court back then…I mean, French revolution aside, but if I couldn’t get dressed without my underwear being passed around from noblewoman to princess to Princess of the Blood, I would have cursed out everyone within hearing distance and then be sent back to whatever country I came from.

What I Thought Was Meh:

Louis Auguste. Poor, awkward Louis Auguste. I kind of felt sorry for our dear dauphin. He’s just sooooo awkward. However, he annoyed the hell out of me, because Marie would be trying to tell him how she felt and he’d just repeat something one of his tutors told him. Like, damn it, Louis, you’re going to be the king of France. Grow a backbone! Also, there’s all this build up about why they didn’t consummate their marriage, but it’s left by the wayside and will get picked back up in the second book. If you studied history, you know why it took so long, but it didn’t need to be treated like it was some big secret. I did love his character when he and Marie would have their tender moments though. Hopefully, there’ll be more of those in the sequel.

The conflict between Marie and the king’s mistress, Madame du Barry, was equally awkward, and it didn’t need to happen. I know it does happen in history, and Marie uttered her utterly insipid line about how there’s people at Versailles, but the way it’s portrayed in this novel made me want to bang my head on the wall. A good five chapters was spent with Marie going “Should I talk to her?” and then “No, she’s a whore” over and over again. And it was especially annoying that the only reason she started this whole conflict was because Marie got advice from people she should’ve ran away screaming from. At least it was entertaining.

What I Didn’t Like:

The pacing!!!!!!! I ended up putting the novel down toward the beginning of the novel, because the chapters where she’s training to be the dauphine were just soooooooo boring. I can only read so much about the Versailles glide and her hideous medieval braces for so long. Don’t get me wrong, I did find all of this interesting, but not interesting enough. I did soldier through though and the pacing did pick up once she (FINALLY!) arrived at Versailles.

Final Verdict:

All in all, I liked Becoming Marie Antoinette. Even though the pacing was really slow, I did love Marie’s character and she had me laughing out loud during some scenes. It’s really like listening to Marie Antoinette tell her story. I do plan to start the next book soon!

Rating: B+